techspotlight
techspotlight:

Google offers to easily track your life by mining your inbox - GeekWire
Google may think that e-mail users have no expectation of privacy, but they’re certainly doing their best to show people how useful it is to let the search engine giant loose on your mail and calendar.
According to a post to the Official Google Blog today, Google wants to help you find important information that may be buried in a sea of emails, or nestled into a busy calendar. Using voice search, you’ll be able to ask Google about packages, flights, purchases, plans and photos, and it will mine information within your Google accounts to give you the best answer that it can. For example, if you’re waiting for a package, you can ask Google if your package has been delivered yet, and it’ll go into your mail, find the tracking number in an email, and give you the status of your package.
If you ask Google when your flight is, it’ll pick out the flight number from your email, and give you a status report.  Google offers to easily track your life by mining your inbox - GeekWire

techspotlight:

Google offers to easily track your life by mining your inbox - GeekWire

Google may think that e-mail users have no expectation of privacy, but they’re certainly doing their best to show people how useful it is to let the search engine giant loose on your mail and calendar.

According to a post to the Official Google Blog today, Google wants to help you find important information that may be buried in a sea of emails, or nestled into a busy calendar. Using voice search, you’ll be able to ask Google about packages, flights, purchases, plans and photos, and it will mine information within your Google accounts to give you the best answer that it can. For example, if you’re waiting for a package, you can ask Google if your package has been delivered yet, and it’ll go into your mail, find the tracking number in an email, and give you the status of your package.

If you ask Google when your flight is, it’ll pick out the flight number from your email, and give you a status report.  Google offers to easily track your life by mining your inbox - GeekWire

justbesplendid
justbesplendid:

Blueberry mojito by The Novice Chef
Yield: 2 mojitos

Recipe Note: If you do not feel like pureeing your blueberries, just add them to the shaker and smash them with your muddler. It’s faster, just not as pretty of an end result.

ingredients:

1 cup fresh blueberries, plus extra for garnish4 oz clear rum10 fresh mint leaves2 teaspoons sugarjuice of 2 limes6 oz club sodaice

directions:

In a food processor or blender, puree blueberries until smooth. Set aside.
Add mint leaves and sugar to a cocktail shaker. Use a muddler (or the end of a wooden spoon) to muddle the mint and sugar. Add the lime juice, rum and pureed blueberries: shake vigorously.
Pour ice and club soda into two tall glasses and then pour in rum mixture. Gently stir. Garnish with a lime wedge, extra blueberries and a sprig of mint. Serve immediately.

justbesplendid:

Blueberry mojito by The Novice Chef

Yield: 2 mojitos

Recipe Note: If you do not feel like pureeing your blueberries, just add them to the shaker and smash them with your muddler. It’s faster, just not as pretty of an end result.

ingredients:

1 cup fresh blueberries, plus extra for garnish
4 oz clear rum
10 fresh mint leaves
2 teaspoons sugar
juice of 2 limes
6 oz club soda
ice

directions:

In a food processor or blender, puree blueberries until smooth. Set aside.

Add mint leaves and sugar to a cocktail shaker. Use a muddler (or the end of a wooden spoon) to muddle the mint and sugar. Add the lime juice, rum and pureed blueberries: shake vigorously.

Pour ice and club soda into two tall glasses and then pour in rum mixture. Gently stir. Garnish with a lime wedge, extra blueberries and a sprig of mint. Serve immediately.

humanscalecities

urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco

Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.
The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 
Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.
techspotlight
That word processor you use at the office? It was designed in the early ’80s, when the first version of Microsoft Word shipped. While revision after revision of this prehistoric technology have been released, all are modeled after a world long forgotten—a world of 8.5x11 paper, carriage returns, and ink ribbons.
smartercities

smartercities:

In its first few years, the London charging scheme was heralded as a solid traffic-buster, with 15-20 percent boosts in auto and bus speeds and 30 percent reductions in congestion delays. Most of those gains appear to have disappeared in recent years, however. Transport for London (TfL), which combines the functions of our NYCDOT and MTA and which created and operates the charging system, attributes the fallback in speeds to other changes in the streetscape and traffic management …

Car Traffic Declines

Bicycle Usage Rises

Public Transit Use Increases